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PostPosted: 02 Jan 2010, 01:44 
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Joined: 23 Jul 2009, 01:36
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I am getting ready to replace the inside transom board on my 1952 Alumacraft. I know that alot of folks are gluing plywood together to use for the inside board instead of solid lumber. The outside of the boat used plywood and it seems to splinter very easily from the outboard being clamped against it. I know that it can easily be replaced at any time but the inside board is a little more work with 2 gussets to be removed first. If I wanted to stick with a solid board for the inside, what type of wood would you use. I know that I can get Red Oak, Poplar and Maple. I may be able to get cypress also. I figure that if the original solid lumber has lasted 58 years I would stick the same back in. Any help would be appreciated



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PostPosted: 02 Jan 2010, 06:49 
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Location: Cullman AL. (north Central)
I have experience and stories from way back on that issue.
It don't matter what you use or how you treat it, the wood will splinter where the clamps go.

Find a fine grained, very linear piece of solid wood, or a piece of Marine Plywood made of hardwood and you'll be happy for a long time. Use Stainless above the water line and bronze below and you wont have stains in the wood that will come through the paint.

The most success I had with that was a piece of Stainless scrap I used to protect the wood from the clamps, which worked pretty good.
I used Solid wood on the inside and out of my Star Craft the second time I replaced the transom. That was better than plywood for appearance.

I can't imagine any wood from the U.S. that would hold up any better than anything else.
I've always wanted to see what that "Iron Wood" from Australia would be like.


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PostPosted: 02 Jan 2010, 10:13 
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I agree with thudpucker on the stainless.I used marine plywood on mine & capped it with stainless so the motor doesn't touch the wood.For me capping it with stainless strengthens the transom.



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PostPosted: 02 Jan 2010, 10:33 

Joined: 17 Sep 2009, 08:22
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Location: Charleston, SC
If you give the wood a skim coat of epoxy you won't have this problem. If you don't want to use epoxy you could try PL. If you get the PL self leveling concrete sealant it is so thin it will go on with a putty knife. Squirt a pile of it out from the tube and skim it on. I have been using PL ever since I did some reading on it and you wouldn't be setting any precidence giving it a shot.

Here is enough reading to decide if you think its a worthwhile option.
http://www.simplicityboats.com/pl_premium.htm

And how about this. a boat built with plywood, PL adhesive, and fiberglass drywall tape. six years sitting outside and still seaworthy.
http://www.simplicityboats.com/pl_testimonials.html

Anyway, I have been using it quite a bit on my rig and I am pleased with the results.



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PostPosted: 02 Jan 2010, 23:23 

Joined: 05 Oct 2008, 12:14
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I used 2 pieces of 1/2 plywood and a 1x6 oak board all glued and screwed together. I also have an aluminum piece where the screw clamps hit.



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PostPosted: 03 Jan 2010, 11:40 
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PostPosted: 03 Jan 2010, 23:12 
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I'm fixing to laminate 4 pieces of alucabond together to replace the transom in my 14 footer. I replaced it with sealed plywood probably 12 years ago and it is due again. I should never have to replace it again after this next round. There will be nothing there to rot.



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PostPosted: 04 Jan 2010, 00:10 
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Quackrstackr wrote:
I'm fixing to laminate 4 pieces of alucabond together to replace the transom in my 14 footer. I replaced it with sealed plywood probably 12 years ago and it is due again. I should never have to replace it again after this next round. There will be nothing there to rot.


Quackr, I'm considering decking my boat with a similar product. Do you have any experience using it?



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PostPosted: 04 Jan 2010, 11:07 
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Location: KY Lake
Brine wrote:
Quackrstackr wrote:
I'm fixing to laminate 4 pieces of alucabond together to replace the transom in my 14 footer. I replaced it with sealed plywood probably 12 years ago and it is due again. I should never have to replace it again after this next round. There will be nothing there to rot.


Quackr, I'm considering decking my boat with a similar product. Do you have any experience using it?


Yeah, we use it all of the time around here for all sorts of projects. One of their manufacturing plants is within 20 miles of me and I have several friends that work there.

I've made goose decoys, decked boats, built shooting houses, built duck blinds and my buddies have recently been using it for transoms in their boats.

It is pretty pricey stuff but my buddies that work there get to buy the seconds for little of nothing.



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PostPosted: 04 Jan 2010, 11:47 

Joined: 31 Jul 2009, 18:09
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Location: Bertram, Texas
Crappie Stalker wrote:
I am getting ready to replace the inside transom board on my 1952 Alumacraft. I know that alot of folks are gluing plywood together to use for the inside board instead of solid lumber. The outside of the boat used plywood and it seems to splinter very easily from the outboard being clamped against it. I know that it can easily be replaced at any time but the inside board is a little more work with 2 gussets to be removed first. If I wanted to stick with a solid board for the inside, what type of wood would you use. I know that I can get Red Oak, Poplar and Maple. I may be able to get cypress also. I figure that if the original solid lumber has lasted 58 years I would stick the same back in. Any help would be appreciated


A solid piece of wood is not as strong as a good laminate, like plywood, especially good marine ply. Use a good epoxy and a light cloth (like 6 oz) and it will never splinter. You could also use a sacrificial clamp board on the inside and outside of the transom; one that can be easily removed and replaced as necessary. Using a piece of Alu or stainless will also keep it from splintering. Bolting the motor to the transom will help as well.

I would not replace the transom with lumber, use ply, it's not even close. Then I would add sacrificial clamping boards inside and out or permanent metal clamping bases.



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PostPosted: 04 Jan 2010, 15:53 
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Quackrstackr wrote:
Yeah, we use it all of the time around here for all sorts of projects. One of their manufacturing plants is within 20 miles of me and I have several friends that work there.

I've made goose decoys, decked boats, built shooting houses, built duck blinds and my buddies have recently been using it for transoms in their boats.

It is pretty pricey stuff but my buddies that work there get to buy the seconds for little of nothing.


Well, I guess that's all the assurance I needed. I can buy sheets of .125 that are 4 x 12 for $100 ea. Thanks.



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PostPosted: 06 Jan 2010, 22:28 

Joined: 03 Jan 2010, 12:57
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Location: Iowa
but if you do insist on using a piece of solid lumber (I ain't mad at ya) cypress would be the most moister resistant compared to red oak or maple. Red oak being the last choice.



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PostPosted: 08 Jan 2010, 12:52 
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Thanks for all the help on this. Where are you finding the marine plywood at? Our local big chain hardware stores say they do not carry it. I don't really think they knew what it was.
As soon as we get out of these 10-15 deg. days, I can get back on this project. I can't wait to get on the water.
Thanks



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PostPosted: 12 Jan 2010, 22:42 

Joined: 10 Jan 2010, 22:16
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Location: Carrollton,TX
I'm doing a overhual on a 1952 also got any picks of the new transom?
Thanks


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