1973 Lowe 1648 Jon Flooring/Transom Questions

Greenhead

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First off let me say hello to everyone from South Dakota. Awesome to see the amount of knowledge here. I have been reading so much my head is kind of spinning. I am really pretty much new to boats, at least aluminum boats. I just picked up a 1973 Lowe 1648 Jon, I am pretty sure it is a "Big Jon" 16. At least according to a 1975 flyer I found on the Lowe website. I do know the floor is 48", sides are 20" and the transom is 63"x15.5" I couldn't find anything older than the 1975 flyer. I bought it with a Shorelander trailer (13" wheels) and it also had a quickset Avery blind on it, no motor.

1973 Lowe.png

My plan for the boat is just for duck hunting, and then out a few times in the spring/summer to keep things in check. Most all the hunting I do is on sloughs or small lakes/ponds. I am here really to get thoughts/concerns and look for some feedback on my ideas. I do know the transom is shot and needs rebuilt and Id like to put flooring down for starters.

My first question - Should I just keep the wood transom the stock size? Meaning should I just replace it with the same size wood cutout, or should I fill the entire height of the transom with wood, too the floor? According to 1975 flyer motor rating is 30hp. Would I be in trouble putting a 35hp motor on it. I am more than likely going with a surface drive. Most all I see available are 23hp or 35hp, unless I build my own with a sd kit and motor I supply, then I could get something close to 30hp. Or just stick with a 23hp build the transom out to stock size and call it good? Guessing most will say keep it stock and save the material and weight for something else....
1973 Lowe4.jpg 1973 Lowe2.jpg

Next question - On the outside of the transom there are rivets that stick out about half an inch, basically where the motor would mount. Would this be fore like a trim plate or something? Can I remove them so it is flush for when I do get a motor? In the pic you can see an outline, the rivets are within the solid area.

1973 Lowe1.jpg

Last question for now ha - I plan to put down some wood flooring. Do I need to fasten it down? If so could I just use some angle iron and bolt it to the benches, thoughts? I don't care how dirty this gets. I am not going for plush comfy hunting but I don't like the idea of walking across the bare floor and ribs

1973 Lowe5.jpg 1973 Lowe6.jpg

Thanks in advance look forward to your replies!
 

LDUBS

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I don't have any special knowledge, but I do have some thoughts:

Transom wood replacement: I figure the guys who built the boat knew what they were doing. So,would keep it the same size.

Rivets on the transom: From the picture it looks like they had a plate of some sort on the outside of the transom. I don't know if that would be original or an add-on. I'm guessing that is what those rivets were for. I would remove them only if needed, or even better replace with something that doesn't stick out that far. Or, put another plate on. The holes would need to be filled for any removed.

Floor: I like the idea of fastening it down if for no other reason it doesn't blow out when you are towing it down the road. Keeping it simple with some angle works. Wouldn't take much to make it secure. Makes it easy to remove too, if you ever have to.

Outboard size: Can't help with that.

Better minds than mine will hopefully fill in the blanks.

Congrats on the new boat and welcome to TinBoat.net.
 

gogittum

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Not familiar enuf with mud motors to help there, (seems like 23 hp should be plenty, tho') but I do have one thing I'm a bug on:

Keep It Light ! ! !

I think I've said before here that years ago I had a 16 ft Ouachita tin boat and it was a great little boat. Went like hell with an 18 Evinrude on it.

Sooo....I improved it. Light aluminum mini-console, bigger motor, remote controls & steering, nice, padded swivel seats, plywood floor, carpet, trolling motor, etc., etc. It did the job I wanted, but the extra weight turned it into a pig to handle and a lot of the pleasure was gone. Lesson learned.

In my current boat - 16 ft Starcraft - I wanted quieter floors to walk on, so added regular, smooth, (no nap) indoor/outdoor carpet and glued it directly to the floor with spray adhesive. Works well. Quieter than the metal, lighter than wood. I did a repair to the hull a few days ago and just peeled the carpet up in that area, then sprayed some more to re-glue it when done. Henry's carpet adhesive is permanent stuff and you won't peel that up.

On mine, I left a 4" gap in the carpet down the centerline to facilitate drainage. Looking at your pics, I think I'd put the carpet flat to leave the drainage grooves open. Carpet holds water.

As I say, not familiar with mud motors, but my 25 hp Johnson 2 smoke drives my boat to 28 mph/5,500 rpm and cruises very nicely at 22 mph/4,000 rpm.
 

DaleH

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TRANSOM - I'd replace wood as is ... the knees are giving additonal support. I have some good posts on transom replacements using exterior plywood and Raka epoxy.

HP LIMIT - If the 35 is all you can get, just don't open her up, LOL! Would likely be fine with a new transom, but I bet the 25 would scoot her along just nicely!

FLOOR - FRP panel is light, I'd use that or thinner wood covered by marine vinyl, just don't want to slip whilst shooting.

Don't use PT wood!
 

Greenhead

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Thanks for the replies.

For the tranaom I am gojng ro just replace it as it was origianlly installed. Ill use exterior ply and epoxy. The transom is 1.5" so Ill have to double up 3/4" ply and glue them together with tightbond 3, then epoxy and paint. I do plan to use stainless hardware to install rather than rivets. Ill get a plate for the inside and outside as well. I am also hoping to not need to remove the supports from the floor but wont know til the time comes. Also just planning to go with a 23hp or 25hp motor.


For the floor I am looking at rubber stall mat with 1.5" closed cell insulation now. Less work than plywood and about the same weight or a little havier. https://youtu.be/C0PpypzsvjU. There is just something I dont like about walking directly on the floor and ribs. But appreciate the info. I do understand keep it light but am going to add weight one way or the other with a floor. How much is the question.....if aluminum wasnt so expensive Id consider that opition, but I can get the rubber mats and insulation for under 100$
 

airshot

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Sounds like you have some good plans, I would agree with your transom plans and really like the foam board and stall mats for the floor!! You mentioned angle iron....dont use that ! Go with aluminum angle, NO iron as it will create corrosion issues...aluminum rivets and SS screws are a good plan, just be sure to use a good sealant on anything going all the way thru the hull !! You are not skiing so no need for a high hp motor, anyrhing 20 hp and up will move you along quite nicely. You might consider giving the inside a thorough cleaning and a coat of gluvit to seal any leaks that might be there. Keep us posted on your progress, looks like a fun project !!
 

Greenhead

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Thanks for the gluvit suggestion I was just reading about it and other things to seal the boat interior. And yea I typed angle iron but meant angle aluminum lol.

As far as sealant and epoxy for the transom wood and holes for fastening....any recommendations from say menards, lowes or something local?

I have come to the same conclusion on the motor and am looking at 20-30hp surface drive motors.
 

DaleH

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Greenhead said:
Thanks for the gluvit suggestion I was just reading about it and other things to seal the boat interior. And yea I typed angle iron but meant angle aluminum lol.

As far as sealant and epoxy for the transom wood and holes for fastening....any recommendations from say menards, lowes or something local?
Let me just say … EVERYTHING you need for an epoxy source and for the ‘how to’ replacing a transom is in this post:

https://forum.tinboats.net/viewtopic.php?p=481416&hilit=Holiday#p481416

The only other thing I will add is, in place of Gluvit, consider West Systems G-Flex 650 as it is a flexible epoxy. ALL epoxies need to be covered with paint … if exposed to the sun.
 

airshot

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Something you might consider is called " leak stopper" clear seal. Availiable thru Home Depot and Tractor Supply. It is a clear roof coating that holds up extremely well. Used it to seal up a leaky jon boat about 5-6 years ago. Boat has been dragged over rocks, stones and gravel for all these years, sits out in sun, rain, snow etc and still does not leak a drop !! Paint it on with a brush, a little thicker than gluvit, but wears like iron. It has outlasted the black roof sealer on my barn many times over...just a thought......
 

Greenhead

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Just pulled the old wood out of the transom. It was shot, no good for a template. I have had the ACX plywood glued and clamped for about 24hrs, but I will leave it until I'm ready to cut. I will make a carboard template and then transfer that to my wood. I was hoping to not have to take out the knees but there is no way around that, as far as installation goes so, they had to come out. 39 holes in all, a few extras from the previous owner for a depth finder they had mounted and some rear reflectors. I found the hull tag under one of the reflectors and I was right it is a 16ft Big Jon or 16 BJ as it is tagged lol.

1973 Lowe Transom.jpg

1973 Loew T1.jpg

Thanks for all the recommendations so far. I am not going to order anything which means I am not going to be epoxy sealing the wood. I am just going to put some deck stain/sealer on it, several coats. I wasn't able to find 3M5200 either, so I got some Loctite PL Marine. The only thing I was able to find locally was ACX, Titebond3 and stainless hardware and closed cell insulation and used 1/2" rubber mats for the floor. Now just need to get this work all done.... Oh, I need a motor too. That I will order if I cannot find one locally. Also I will be putting a plate on the outside and inside of the transom for the motor, just need to find one....locally
 

thill

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I strongly suggest that you go to Walmart, Lowes or wherever, and buy some Thompson's Wood preserver. That stuff is the bomb. After cutting the transom wood to size, roll it on the flats and especially on the edges of the wood. It soaks in like water. Give it an hour and apply a 2nd application, and install. I might hit it once more after the install. You will be very glad you did. It's cheap, super easy to install and effective. A garden sprayer makes it even easier to apply.

We used to build sheds with raw T1-11 plywood siding, which rots very easily, especially if dirt splashes on it from the rain. We used the Thompson's, and many of those sheds are STILL looking great, 20 years later. I've had outstanding success with it in boats, too. Just make sure to get full coverage, and it just works.
 

cyclops2

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1/4"thick EXTERIOR Plywood for the floor that is sealed with a EXTERIOR PAINT on all edges and sides at least 2 coats. Do not block the floor grooves in any way. Bilge pump in a S S cage to keep junk out of it. Mount it at the transom in either corner. Then a bow up & a sharp turn will place all the water at the bilge pump.

the 2... 4' x 8' floor sheets can be held in place with 1" dots of silicone rubber in a few places. The dots will pull loose for any major floor cleaning needed.
A new piece of NON P T plywood for the transom will be needed. Lots of simple small projects. I use 2 gas tanks with my 2 stroke Evinrude 30. A 14 gallon main tank and a RESERVE 6 gallon tank. same hose connectors. tank are in the bow. A size 24 battery in the stern in a covered battery box glued to floor board. i built a side mounted console for all controls. There is also a removable cushioned chair with padded armrests for relaxing. Bow & stern anchors to keep the sun at my back.

Think a LOT. Cut 1 time. Enjoy :)
 

airshot

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That outline on the transom was probably another piece of wood, most smaller boats use a clamp on motor, it is best if there is wood on both sides of the transom to give the motor clamps something to bite on. Many motors have slipped off of all metal transoms, and in case you didnt know, the dont float !!! I learned that many years ago !!
 

airshot

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Forgot to add....put a few "rivnuts" into your ribs to hold the flooring, this way it can be easily removed for cleaning !!!
 

cyclops2

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Motors do have holes to be used to bolt them to the transom. Some also provide holes to tie the clamp screws together. Either can prevent motors from falling off during normal cruising.
 

airshot

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Motors do have holes to be used to bolt them to the transom. Some also provide holes to tie the clamp screws together. Either can prevent motors from falling off during normal cruising.
Safety chains also keep them from sinking, but having wood on both sides of the transom greatly lessens the chances of the motor comming loose. Many smaller (portable) motors dont have the extra mounting holes for bolts. Back in my younger days. ( thats waaaay back) only motors over 25 hp had bolt holes, all motors had clamps, with the bigger over 25 hp having the additional bolt holes.
 
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