Rod Repair Question

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LDUBS

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I need to replace a broken guide. The thread wrap is epoxy coated -- pretty thick. Any tips on removing the existing epoxy coated wrap without damaging the rod? Thought I would ask before I go to work with the trusty old Exacto knife.
 
You need to use heat to soften the epoxy - But be careful, as too much can soften the rod blank resin.
Just the flame from a butane grill lighter, briefly applied, is enough. Get the wrapping resin just soft enough and you can slice it at the guide foot, and then peel it off.
 
Hmmm. Actually, I would not use heat. Sure it will help get off the epoxy, but IMO it weakens the blank underneath, reducing its structural integrity. IME there is no substitute for the following: use a sharp razor to cut the threads along the side of the guide feet, never cutting toward the blank. Some folks will cut on top of the guides foot and that's fine too. Peel the guide off. Then carefully cut away the chunks of stiff epoxy/varnish. I then scrape the area formerly occupied by the guide with the razor blade's edge held vertical, scraping as you go. Use fine grit sandpaper if needed. Have done many hundreds this way, and have perhaps 50 teed up right now for guide freshening.
 
I build rods and do a fair amount of repair. I only heat tip guides, and just a little. For regular guides, lay your razor or exacto knife flat on top of the guide food, and shave toward the guide. Make sure to keep it flat and not dig. The first pass, you will probably only shave some of the epoxy, but then you will shave the thread from on top of the guide foot.

Then, you should be able to peel the rest of the epoxy and thread off. After that, soak a piece of cloth or paper towen in isopropyl alcohol and soak the remaining epoxy and then lay your razor flat and carefully shave a line in it. Then peel that off.

If you are careful, you will get it all off without leaving a trace. If you are putting another guide in it's place, any scuffs will be covered, but be careful, and it will go fine.

You CAN heat epoxy, you just need to be very careful. I stopped doing that a long time ago, except for tip guides, as previously stated.
 
Stay away from using heat.
As has already been pointed out the blank itself can be damaged badly from heat.
To remove guide thread wraps covered with epoxy I’ve found single edged utility razor blades held in your fingers to be the best tool for that job.
Large razor knives and other sharp blades with handles allow you to get lots of leverage when “shaving” through the epoxy and if you slip with a big razor knife, you can destroy the blank.
Hold a razor blade horizontal to the wraps you want removed and slowly and gently start to shave off layers of the epoxy.
You‘re not trying to remove it all in a single pass.
A little at a time over many passes is the way to go and will get ‘er done just fine.
Work slowly and carefully and you’ll develop a feel for it.
Its not hard, it just requires you taking your time.
 
I'm no expert, but have replaced a few rod guides with success without using heat and by just using the razor blade method being mentioned by others,
 
Thanks everyone. I managed to get the old wrap & epoxy coating off using the razor blade without causing any damage. Luckily I had the thread color left over from before and got the new guide installed.
 
We live in the age of a “just buy a new one” mentality, but that doesn't mean it's the best way to go. Fixing a rod yourself is much cheaper and more rewarding than just tossing it in the trash. Fishing rods repair is quite easy, and you can fix just about anything on your rod with little knowledge or experience.
 
AI bot not withstanding, anyone know how to re-attach a broken tip?

Like this one...

718498262.jpg
DSC06169.JPG

I think I already know the answer, but I figured I'd ask anyway.
 
Me wonders if I slice the rod guide off of the end and attach the old tip, if it would work? Then what epoxy to use?

What I was thinking too. Remove that last guide. Put the tip top back on. Rod will be a couple inches shorter. Don't use epoxy. Use one of those hot melt sticks made for rod tips.
 
AI bot not withstanding, anyone know how to re-attach a broken tip?

Like this one...

View attachment 117868
View attachment 117867

I think I already know the answer, but I figured I'd ask anyway.
You have two options and neither one if really good.
FIrst, is like others have said, just put a new tip on what remains of the rod and deal with the loss of tip action, or make a ferrule and reattach the broken tip. The latter will no doubt result in just as bad a reduction in the rods action and likely create a new stress point eventually failing again.
The reality of it is that the rod is now never going to be 100% or the same as it once was. The only perfect solution is to replace it. Anything other than that and its a band aid at best and throwing good money after bad.
You could strip the rod down, and rebuild it as a new rod respacing the guides to suit its new, faster action but it will never be the same again.

Broken rods are easier to repair when the break is lower or in a place where a ferrule can be placed on the inside and properly tapered so as not to create a stress point but when you loose a tip like that your options are limited.

You could also find a suitable replacement blank and transfer over all the components to the new blank but whether or not that's worth while would depend on what the rod is in the first place.
 
You have two options and neither one if really good.
FIrst, is like others have said, just put a new tip on what remains of the rod and deal with the loss of tip action, or make a ferrule and reattach the broken tip. The latter will no doubt result in just as bad a reduction in the rods action and likely create a new stress point eventually failing again.
The reality of it is that the rod is now never going to be 100% or the same as it once was. The only perfect solution is to replace it. Anything other than that and its a band aid at best and throwing good money after bad.
You could strip the rod down, and rebuild it as a new rod respacing the guides to suit its new, faster action but it will never be the same again.

Broken rods are easier to repair when the break is lower or in a place where a ferrule can be placed on the inside and properly tapered so as not to create a stress point but when you loose a tip like that your options are limited.

You could also find a suitable replacement blank and transfer over all the components to the new blank but whether or not that's worth while would depend on what the rod is in the first place.
Understood. I know it will never be the same as it was.

Good thing is, they replaced it under warranty and didn't want it back, so I figured I would try and save it. No harm, no foul.
 
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