VHF radios

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Crazyboat

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I don't imagine many that fish/boat on small lakes always carry a VHF with them. But for those of you that do, can you recommend one brand or model over others?
 
Had many different ones over many years, never saw much difference between them.
I'm in general agreement with you. A basic high power as I could get always served my purpose as I never venture too far from the coast. That said, with this boat being bigger and me most likely will be hosting a fair number of non-boaters I thought it might be best to spring for an extra buck or two just to ensure reliability. I'm putting the word out for reliability, and I guess sound quality.
 
ICOM has been around the longest and they also sell radios to the government, police, fire, amateur radio, etc. I’d buy an ICOM over a Garmin, Lowrance, etc.

First thing is to check if the lakes that you fish have someone monitoring the marine band. Then look into features that make sense like waterproof to IP67, radio automatically sends gps coordinates when during emergency transmission, RF output, audio amp power, remote speaker, etc.
 
I had a Standard Horizon mobile that I kept in the kayak life vest. Nice padded pocket made for mobile radios. The external mic connector broke in less than a year. So your mileage may vary by model and use case.
 
Had a Standard Horizon (console/not handheld) with a good 6' antenna for 3 years on the previous boat and it worked well. Basically line of sight with VHF so consider a non-handheld for the extra range you get with a better antenna is my suggestion.
 
I don't imagine many that fish/boat on small lakes always carry a VHF with them. But for those of you that do, can you recommend one brand or model over others?
The last surviving one that I currently have (of at least 4) takes... wait for it.. AA batteries.. what a concept...lots cheaper than a battery pack and no babysitting it in the off season...price a new battery pack for any model you consider
 
The last surviving one that I currently have (of at least 4) takes... wait for it.. AA batteries.. what a concept...lots cheaper than a battery pack and no babysitting it in the off season...price a new battery pack for any model you consider
The ones I am looking at have the battery pack as well as a AA or AAA back up option. Thanks, good idea for sure.
 
ICOM has been around the longest and they also sell radios to the government, police, fire, amateur radio, etc. I’d buy an ICOM over a Garmin, Lowrance, etc.

First thing is to check if the lakes that you fish have someone monitoring the marine band. Then look into features that make sense like waterproof to IP67, radio automatically sends gps coordinates when during emergency transmission, RF output, audio amp power, remote speaker, etc.
I'll be using the Hudson river and south to the Jersey shore. All salt unless I go way north on the river.
 
You will want a mobile, not a hand held.
A fixed unit will come, but I want a hand held. I won't be going off shore. (I always stay a swimmer's distance from shore with the exception of exiting the mouth of the Hudson heading south to Sandy Hook. Even then I'll often run the coast just for the view.
 
A fixed unit will come, but I want a hand held. I won't be going off shore. (I always stay a swimmer's distance from shore with the exception of exiting the mouth of the Hudson heading south to Sandy Hook. Even then I'll often run the coast just for the vie
I can see a handie if you are running a small boat. It will just have some limitations.

What’s your intention with the radio? For emergencies only, monitor radio traffic or talk to someone in a boat or on shore?
 
WELL.... as we have migrated from LAKES to the ocean.. and thrown some SALT into the mix...
might I suggest you introduce some corrosion proofing on ALL electrical contacts you can see and NOT see.. break it down and remove microphones, antennas, battery's and Q tip some dielectric grease or spray stuff on all the metal you can see, and battery contacts... I keep my grease and Q tips next to my battery stash.
 
For me, it's a Standard Horizon HX890, no contest. Features I like:
Price: It can be had for $169 at The GPS Store.
Water Resistance: IPX8 (Continuously submersible in more than a meter of water.)
It floats!
Built to Military Standard 810-F (Here is a link that gives a general description of MIL STD 810: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MIL-STD-810)
Has NOAA weather stations.
Built in Digital Selective Calling (DSC) which can be a life saver if you need it.
It is user friendly, though I suspect that most radios are getting more user friendly these days.
 
I can see a handie if you are running a small boat. It will just have some limitations.

What’s your intention with the radio? For emergencies only, monitor radio traffic or talk to someone in a boat or on shore?
Mainly emergency situations. Nice to monitor chatter to see if the bite is on anywhere or if weather is rolling in.
 
For me, it's a Standard Horizon HX890, no contest. Features I like:
Price: It can be had for $169 at The GPS Store.
Water Resistance: IPX8 (Continuously submersible in more than a meter of water.)
It floats!
Built to Military Standard 810-F (Here is a link that gives a general description of MIL STD 810: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MIL-STD-810)
Has NOAA weather stations.
Built in Digital Selective Calling (DSC) which can be a life saver if you need it.
It is user friendly, though I suspect that most radios are getting more user friendly these days.
I placed this model on my list of must buys for tonight. That and a dock box, garden hose, air horn as the horn on the boat is an insult and some other miscellaneous items.
 

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