1992 Polar Kraft MVT-1751 with a 1992 Evinrude 60 HP…my first tin boat project

TinBoats.net

Help Support TinBoats.net:

This site may earn a commission from merchant affiliate links, including eBay, Amazon, and others.
Aye Capt’n … Steady as she goes

I’m sure Thill has read this thread, because he has commented along the way.

After studying the pic I posted more, I believe I can simply raise the assembly until the roller sits under the eye fitting. That will raise the winch making a straighter pull.

It’s free to loosen the nuts and try a different position, so that’s what I’ll try.

On another note. Should the transom be lined up with the end of the bunks? Or is it ok to have the back of the boat past the ends of the bunks a few inches? Right now the transom is even with the bunks.
 

Attachments

  • 49857DB3-CF66-4AB3-B557-2681A6ACBB22.jpeg
    49857DB3-CF66-4AB3-B557-2681A6ACBB22.jpeg
    506.8 KB · Views: 1
Last edited:
Aye Capt’n … Steady as she goes

I’m sure Thill has read this thread, because he has commented along the way.

After studying the pic I posted more, I believe I can simply raise the assembly until the roller sits under the eye fitting. That will raise the winch making a straighter pull.

It’s free to loosen the nuts and try a different position, so that’s what I’ll try.

On another note. Should the transom be lined up with the end of the bunks? Or is it ok to have the back of the boat past the ends of the bunks a few inches? Right now the transom is even with the bunks.

The transom should be 100% supported by the bunks. The transom should not hang past the end the bunks. It is very normal for the bunks to extend 1/2' - 1" beyond the transom. I would shift the bunks back an inch.
 
My wife has been sick & hospitalized since December 26th. I haven’t had time to do anything for the last four months. I decided to start making time to work on this boat, otherwise it will never get done.

Yesterday I started sanding, inspecting and preparing the interior so I can paint it. After I have painted it, I want to get the rib reinforcement angles permanently riveted/bonded to the ribs, that will support the floor sheet I cut previously.

I spent about four hours sanding, another hour or two cleaning and wiping everything with acetone. It was kind of a tedious job, but I got it done and applied a coat of paint last night. It took another hour at least to paint it, again, it was a tedious lob, but now it is done and ready for the next step.
 

Attachments

  • IMG_3005.HEIC.jpeg
    IMG_3005.HEIC.jpeg
    153.3 KB · Views: 0
  • IMG_3011.jpeg
    IMG_3011.jpeg
    174.7 KB · Views: 0
  • IMG_5174.jpeg
    IMG_5174.jpeg
    156.8 KB · Views: 0
Thanks for the kind words, she has been through a lot in the last four months.

I had to bend the 1.5” .125 angles a little past 90 degrees. The vertical sides of the ribs aren’t perfectly perpendicular to the floor, or parallel with themselves. I guess the ribs or hat channel’s bowed when installed during manufacturing.

After I made the bends, I reinstalled the angles, and realized I had to bend them a little more. I’m trying to get both top flanges to create a flat surface for the .125 deck that’s going on top.

After making more bends I scuffed them with a scotch Brite pad, and cleaned them up with acetone before sprayed them lightly with zinc chromate primer.
 

Attachments

  • IMG_5178.jpeg
    IMG_5178.jpeg
    152.9 KB · Views: 1
  • IMG_5177.jpeg
    IMG_5177.jpeg
    168.9 KB · Views: 0
  • IMG_5181.jpeg
    IMG_5181.jpeg
    341.1 KB · Views: 0
  • IMG_5179.jpeg
    IMG_5179.jpeg
    362.5 KB · Views: 0
Last edited:
Thanks Thill.

I installed seven (of ten) rib reinforcement angles after work tonight. I stopped at seven because that’s how far one tube of 3M 2200 adhesive went. I have another tube on hand, but I want to have a use for what I won’t need on the three reinforcement angles. I’m going to fabricate some doublers and bond them in place with 3M 2200. I guess my plan will always be to have enough bonded repairs ready for installation before opening a new tube of 3M 2200. I don’t want to waste any more than I have to. Every rivet I put in this boat will go in wet, for added strength & water tight results.

I’ll post a close up picture of a pop rivet “wet installed” with 3M 2200.
 
Last edited:
I was unable to post any pictures in the post above…I will try again.

My internet has been hit or miss for the last week…I hate Brightspeed!

The pictures below show how I wet install a rivet.
 

Attachments

  • IMG_3018.jpeg
    IMG_3018.jpeg
    76.5 KB · Views: 0
  • IMG_3019.jpeg
    IMG_3019.jpeg
    113.9 KB · Views: 0
  • IMG_3020.jpeg
    IMG_3020.jpeg
    78.8 KB · Views: 0
  • IMG_3022.jpeg
    IMG_3022.jpeg
    69.9 KB · Views: 0
Last edited:
My middle kid bought a Tracker 175 Pro last year. He gave me the fish finder that came on it. I guess he upgraded…and I get the brand new never used unit he took off. I need to do some research and figure out what this thIng does.IMG_5214.jpeg
 
I made the time to work on my 1751 this weekend.

I fabricated an aluminum frame that will rivet to the front seat/deck sheet metal. The vertical wall that ends the deck extension will be bonded & riveted to a rib. A previous owner had cut a hole in the front seat to accommodate a 12 gallon fuel tank. I plan on building a 18” x 24” shelf inside to hold the same portable plastic gas tank. The plan is for two storage compartments in this deck extension. A small forward compartment for the anchor & miscellaneous storage will be up front, with a larger full width hatch for the gas tank, TM batteries (if desired] and whatever needs to be stowed.

The aluminum frame uses 1 1/2” .125” angle, 1” x 1” .125” tube and one section of 3” x 1” .125” tube. The three inch section will support the area between the two hatches. Each hatch will have a 1 1/2” flange built into the frame allowing it to rest & attach to the deck.

I ran out of argon, so I am DIW for the weekend.

My wife’s dog likes to hang out with me anytime I go outside….she is my sidekick


IMG_3044.jpegIMG_3042.jpegIMG_3048.jpeg
 
Last edited:
My welds started out kinda ugly, but they got better.

I will finish adding to this and final weld it before riveting it in place.

When the frame structure is out of the boat it is kinda weak and wobbly, but very light. When it is cleco’ed into the boat it is rock solid. That’s how these boats are designed…kinda like an airplane.

Semi-monocoque structure is the term.

IMG_3056.jpeg


IMG_3059.jpegIMG_3054.jpegIMG_3052.jpegIMG_3051.jpegIMG_3062.jpegIMG_3061.jpeg
 
Last edited:
I did a little more fab work on the deck extension frame.

The front hatch is going to be a small 17” x 23” wide. It will be the anchor locker.

The big hatch is 18” x 42” wide. It will have a flat floor/shelf for a 12 gallon gas tank, and room for a battery or two.

IMG_3099.jpegIMG_3105.jpegIMG_3104.jpeg
 
Last edited:
If that is the standard aluminum you buy at Lowes, I have found that the brazing sticks work very well with them, since they have such a low melting point. You even have to be careful with MAP gas. With MIG or TIG, you have to keep the amps down so you don't blow it up, but it looks like you have it well in control. Nice framing!
 
It’s all 5XXX series aluminum. That stuff from Lowes is probably 1XXX series. When I build my transom frame I’ll probably use 7075 T-6 .25” thick. I wish I could weld better.
 
I cleaned up the existing front deck .064” sheet metal. I also wire brushed & sanded the interior hull skin, up under my front deck. I will paint it all before I attaching the deck extension the final time. Right now the front deck extension framework is cleco’ed in place.
IMG_3140.jpegIMG_3136.jpeg
 
I added two supports, about mid way, between the front of the boat and the end of the deck extension. Each one will get riveted to the rib, wet with 3M 5200, on final assembly.

Next, I need to figure out how the (gas tank) shelf will be installed, in the bigger rear compartment.

IMG_3148.jpegIMG_3146.jpeg
 

Latest posts

Top