How many of you enjoy a decent stereo in a boat?

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thill

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For most of my boating career, I had a cheap radio in the boat and rarely used it. I didn't want noise when fishing and they sound horrible anyway.

A few years ago, I picked up a 24' Wellcraft that had a serious sound system, with two Kicker amps, a 12" sub and 6 full-range speakers, including a pair of 8" Kenwood marine speakers. What struck me was the QUALITY of the sound. It immersed you in crystal-clear sound, even at very low volumes. A rather pleasant experience.

When entertaining friends and their kids I would crank up music, and it was fun. Kids laughing and dancing around, and parents enjoying it, too. Suddenly, music became part of my boating experience.

Now, I'm rebuilding a runabout, and I'm trying to decide whether or not to add a decent stereo. The system I have in mind will only cost about $400, but that's money I could save, without the option.

So here is the question:
If YOU were looking at a boat to buy, and it was in good shape overall, would having a decent stereo be a plus for you? Would you pay $500 more for a boat with a nice stereo over one with none?

I'm, very interested in your replies.
 
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If I purchased a fishing boat that has a stereo I would remove it. IMO it devalues the boat because of the holes that were cut for the head unit and speakers.

A runabout, maybe I’d leave it installed for the wife. I probably wouldn’t be excited about it so, no I would not see the value in the stereo.
 
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Now that is interesting. You sound like a friend of mine. He removed his stereo and left the holes empty. Some kind of statement, I suppose. I asked him why he did that, and he said he didn't want it in his boat. I asked if he sold it, and he said no, he threw it away. That confused me, but it's his boat.

Most boats I have had came with some kind of radio. I never removed them, just rarely to never used them. Usually, I had to clean up the connections to get them working again when I sold the boat, as they hadn't been used in years, but I hate selling a boat with non-functioning stuff on board.
 
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I used to carry a bluetooth speaker with me, but eventually I bought a cheap Pyle bluetooth headunit and speakers so I don't have to carry the speaker to the boat. It's nice every once in a while. My buddy has a redonkulas stereo in his boat, he also doesn't take fishing poles on his boat- tells you something.
 
From someone that use to enjoy decent home sound systems, but now hearing is such, can't tell the difference between MP3 and FLAC files. :(

For me, never in a fishing boat.

Had a stereo in the bowrider, never used it.

The pontoon stereo might get some use, though.

Sound carries a long way on the water, and tends to annoy others. The Loons sound much better, anyway! ;)
 
I enjoy some light background music or listening to a race but for the most part, very little raduo time on the boat. However, I find most that have big systems make them offensive to others by blasting them wide open over the tip of there excessivily loud exhaust system !! Similiar to loud vehicles driving thru town trying to get noticed !! It is like everything, when used within reason they are nice, but when abused they become very annoying very fast !!
 
I would expect that it would be difficult to keep the rattles down in a tinny, vs a fiberglass Welcraft. Defeating the point of having a quality stereo. JMO
 
I would expect that it would be difficult to keep the rattles down in a tinny, vs a fiberglass Welcraft. Defeating the point of having a quality stereo. JMO
Now THAT is an interesing reply. The 18 Starcraft rattled like crazy. That is the biggest thing I didn't like about that boat. Had I kept it, I would have chased them down with a drill and a pop-rivet gun.

My Princecraft is silent, unless I have something sitting in the splashwell, like a screwdriver or boat plug.

Not sure how the Spectrum is going to be, but I suspect it will be pretty silent. All of that hated carpet is good to keep down noise. :p
 
For most of my boating career, I had a cheap radio in the boat and rarely used it. I didn't want noise when fishing and they sound horrible anyway.

A few years ago, I picked up a 24' Wellcraft that had a serious sound system, with two Kicker amps, a 12" sub and 6 full-range speakers, including a pair of 8" Kenwood marine speakers. What struck me was the QUALITY of the sound. It immersed you in crystal-clear sound, even at very low volumes. A rather pleasant experience.

When entertaining friends and their kids I would crank up music, and it was fun. Kids laughing and dancing around, and parents enjoying it, too. Suddenly, music became part of my boating experience.

Now, I'm rebuilding a runabout, and I'm trying to decide whether or not to add a decent stereo. The system I have in mind will only cost about $400, but that's money I could save, without the option.

So here is the question:
If YOU were looking at a boat to buy, and it was in good shape overall, would having a decent stereo be a plus for you? Would you pay $500 more for a boat with a nice stereo over one with none?

I'm, very interested in your replies.
Absolutely not..
Bass are finicky as it is.
You play the wrong music they will just leave..
Basstards. Lol
 
Now, I'm rebuilding a runabout, and I'm trying to decide whether or not to add a decent stereo. The system I have in mind will only cost about $400, but that's money I could save, without the option.

So here is the question:
If YOU were looking at a boat to buy, and it was in good shape overall, would having a decent stereo be a plus for you? Would you pay $500 more for a boat with a nice stereo over one with none?

I'm, very interested in your replies.

Thinking of some options here. Could just pull the speaker wires. If the new owner wants to add a stereo, they will appreciate it.
 
In this case, there already is a stereo in the boat, but it's an old cassette tape machine, and the speakers are very old. Wires are of a decent gauge and are clean, not corroded.

So I have a choice of installing in a low-power but functional replacement stereo, or a much better one. What I have in mind is a 300 watt BT capable head unit that I bought on clearance a few years ago for $40, some 8" Kenwood coaxials ($149) and some 6-1/2" Sonys ($79) and a 10" Pyle sub, ($49) driven by a cheap, Pyle amp. ($48)

This setup costs roughly $400, and the sound is surprisingly good for the cost. I have this same setup in my Offshore, and guys ask me what I have, but I hesitate to tell them at first. They always insist, and when I tell them, they are usually amazed at how "junk" components can sound so good. Unless they are a JL or WetSounds snob, in which case they lecture at how their brand is the best, which I can't argue.

The Kenwoods are the stars of the show, but in reality, they are $350 speakers, I just got some on clearance. I run them straight off the head unit. The cheap 10" sub and amp add a little more depth to the lows. The Sony's are okay, mainly filling out the sound in the front of the boat.

That's the $400 system, if anyone cares. The boat I'm putting it in is a 16 foot aluminum runabout. It should sound good, with the layout it has, and being such a small space to fill.
 
The thing about all of this, is I'm considering keeping the boat. If I do, the question is moot, the stereo stays. But if not, it depends on the buyer sees any value in it.

This is why I need to water test the boat and get a feel for it before making an educated decision.

Hearing what you tin boaters think of stereos helps give me an idea of the percentages of buyers might be interested. So far, not looking too good for the nicer stereo system
 
For most of my boating career, I had a cheap radio in the boat and rarely used it. I didn't want noise when fishing and they sound horrible anyway.

A few years ago, I picked up a 24' Wellcraft that had a serious sound system, with two Kicker amps, a 12" sub and 6 full-range speakers, including a pair of 8" Kenwood marine speakers. What struck me was the QUALITY of the sound. It immersed you in crystal-clear sound, even at very low volumes. A rather pleasant experience.

When entertaining friends and their kids I would crank up music, and it was fun. Kids laughing and dancing around, and parents enjoying it, too. Suddenly, music became part of my boating experience.

Now, I'm rebuilding a runabout, and I'm trying to decide whether or not to add a decent stereo. The system I have in mind will only cost about $400, but that's money I could save, without the option.

So here is the question:
If YOU were looking at a boat to buy, and it was in good shape overall, would having a edecent stereo be a plus for you? Would you pay $500 more for a boat with a nice stereo over one with none?

I'm, very interested in your replies.
Well, like talkin' it should only be done when it enhances the silence.
 
On a party boat, yes. On my fishing boat, no. Bring your phone and headphones/earbuds and go to town if you want. Then you don't bother anyone else when you listen to whatever else you want to hear. Last thing I want to hear when fishing is everyone else's stereo.
 
I have a bluetooth speaker with pretty good sound that I'll take with on the pontoon boat when family wants to go swimming -it's an older pontoon with no built-in.
There is zero reason there should be a speaker or a stereo in a fishing boat or in any boat that's near me when I'm fishing.
Anytime the topic of the best stereo/speakers comes up in ATV / motorcycle groups too, my response is "the one I can't hear". There's nothing more annoying than other people in public places that think it's cool for me to have to listen to their garbage music.
 

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